BRAIN WAVES AND DEATH. Willard Rich.
BRAIN WAVES AND DEATH
BRAIN WAVES AND DEATH

BRAIN WAVES AND DEATH

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940. First Edition. 8vo., 244pp.; VG/VG-; spine black and blue pictorial with white and blue lettering; dust jacket protected with a mylar covering, price cut; dust jacket has some chipping to corners, head and tail of spine, lesser chipping to edges; small piece of tape on inside of dust jacket along middle of spine; pages slightly age-toned; teal cloth boards with blue lettering; Scribner's seal on copyright page; LP consignment; shelved case 8.

9-436-1282976

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $1,500

NOTES

BRAIN-WAVES AND DEATH was published posthumously under the pseudonym "Willard Rich" a few weeks after its author, William T. Richards, took his own life. Richards worked for Alfred Lee Loomis and his novel was a thinly veiled account of a real-life laboratory located about 40 miles north of New York City nicknamed "Tuxedo Park." This "secret palace of science" was founded and funded by Loomis, arguably one of the most significant and uncredited figures in the history of modern military science. Loomis, a world-class tinkerer in his own right, was a visionary who saw that technology would win the looming war-and indeed that an investment in "big science" would be the key to national strength in the future. Loomis went on to establish the MIT Rad Lab and later was instrumental in setting up the Manhattan Project. According to legend, Loomis had all copies of Richards' roman-a-clef bought up and destroyed. Obviously he missed a few copies, but the book is uncommon , especially in jacket.