ALAY-OOP [SIGNED]. William Gropper.
ALAY-OOP [SIGNED]
ALAY-OOP [SIGNED]
ALAY-OOP [SIGNED]

ALAY-OOP [SIGNED]

New York: Coward-McCann, Inc., 1930. First Edition, First Printing. Octavo, unpaginated; G/none; bound in publisher's orange cloth, blue lettering; boards shaken, moderate rubbing and wear to boards, including fraying to head and tail, smudging, teeth? marks to lower edge of front board; Inscribed twice by Gropper, the first on the title page, "On a vague visit Los Angeles, Aug. 10, 1937 in a trance," the second also on the title page, "Jan 15, 1931 To I. Klein my faithful model who posed for the fly-leaf. With love"; extremely scarce, especially signed; shelved case 2.

9-3-1317546

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $650

NOTES

William Victor "Bill" Gropper (1897-1977), was a U.S. cartoonist, painter, lithographer, and muralist. A committed radical, Gropper is best known for the political work which he contributed to such left wing publications as The Revolutionary Age, The Liberator, The New Masses, The Worker, and The Morning Freiheit. He was the first visual artist to be called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, after which he was blacklisted. Alay-Oop was Gropper's only full-length narrative work.

The New Masses (1926–1948) was an American Marxist magazine closely associated with the Communist Party, USA. New Masses featured the political art of a number of prominent radical cartoonists, including William Gropper and I. Klein. I. (Isidore) Klein (1897-1986) was a Jewish American cartoonist and animator who worked for several significant animation studios including Van Beuren Studios, Screen Gems, Hal Seeger Productions, and Walt Disney, often writing as well as animating. In the 1940s he moved to Paramount's Famous Studios where he wrote for several animated series including Casper, Little Audrey, Little Lulu, and Popeye.