LITERAE NOMINE SENATUS ANGLICANI, CROMWELLII [BOUND TOGETHER WITH] OBSCURORUM VIRORUM EPISTOLAE. John Milton, Richard Cromwell, Pritius Jo. Georg.
LITERAE NOMINE SENATUS ANGLICANI, CROMWELLII [BOUND TOGETHER WITH] OBSCURORUM VIRORUM EPISTOLAE
LITERAE NOMINE SENATUS ANGLICANI, CROMWELLII [BOUND TOGETHER WITH] OBSCURORUM VIRORUM EPISTOLAE
LITERAE NOMINE SENATUS ANGLICANI, CROMWELLII [BOUND TOGETHER WITH] OBSCURORUM VIRORUM EPISTOLAE

LITERAE NOMINE SENATUS ANGLICANI, CROMWELLII [BOUND TOGETHER WITH] OBSCURORUM VIRORUM EPISTOLAE

Lipsiae & Francofurti; Utopiae: Sumptibus Jo. Caspari Mayeri, 1690; [1672]. First German Edition; Later Edition. 12mo., [16], 292 pages, [4], 223 pages; VG; bound in vellum, faded lettering to spine; mild wear and rubbing; ink writing to ffep, second rear endpaper; separate title page for Epistolae, published in Utopiae 1672; text in Latin; First Edition of Literae Nomine published in Germany;

JG consignment; shelved case 0.

9-26-1295039

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $800

NOTES

Literae nomine is a surreptitious publication of dispatches written by Milton in his capacity of Latin secretary to the Council of State, between the years 1649 and 1659. First published in 1676 under title : Literae pseudo-senatus anglicani, Cromwellii.;

The Epistolæ Obscurorum Virorum (English: Letters of Obscure Men) was a celebrated collection of satirical Latin letters which appeared 1515–1519 in Hagenau, Germany. They support the German Humanist scholar Johann Reuchlin and they mock the doctrines and modes of living of the scholastics and monks, mainly by pretending to be letters from fanatic Christian theologians discussing whether all Jewish books should be burned as un-Christian or not. The book was banned in many places, and in regard of the rise of Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation, Pope Leo X excommunicated the authors, readers, and disseminators of the Epistolæ Obscurorum Virorum in 1517, by citing the fact that the discussed matter of burning all Jewish books, especially the Talmud, had never been held as a majority view among Christian scholars. [wikipedia];