THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS. Andrew Carnegie.
THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS
THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS
THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS
THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS

THE GOSPEL OF WEALTH AND OTHER TIMELY ESSAYS

New York: The Century Co., 1900. First Edition. Octavo, xxii; G+; bound in publisher's green cloth, gilt lettering to spine; top edge of text block gilt; spine cocked, weakened binding; tape to front gutter; mild rubbing to boards; interior clean; Scarcer than the 1901 Printing; shelved case 10.

9-25-1307046

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $2,000

NOTES

Contains the following essays: The Gospel of Wealth, originally published in the "North American Review." June and December, 1889; The Advantages of Poverty, originally published in the "Nineteenth Century," March, 1891; Popular Illusions about Trusts, originally published in the "Century Magazine," May, 1900; An Employer's View of the Labor Question, originally published in the "Forum," April, 1886; Results of the Labor Struggle, originally published in the "Forum," August, 1886; Distant Possessions: The Parting of the Ways, originally published in the "North American Review,: August, 1898; Americanism Versus Imperialism, originally published in the "North American Review," January and March, 1899; Democracy in England, originally published in the "North American Review," January, 1886; Home Rule in America, originally published in the "Scottish Leader," September, 1887; Does America Hate England?, originally published in the "Contemporary Review," November, 1897; Imperial Federation, originally published in the "Nineteenth Century," September, 1891;

"Wealth", more commonly known as "The Gospel of Wealth", is an article written by Andrew Carnegie in June of 1889 that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich. Carnegie proposed that the best way of dealing with the new phenomenon of wealth inequality was for the wealthy to utilize their surplus means in a responsible and thoughtful manner. This approach was contrasted with traditional bequest (patrimony), where wealth is handed down to heirs, and other forms of bequest e.g. where wealth is willed to the state for public purposes. Benjamin Soskis, a historian of philanthropy, refers to the article as the 'urtext' of modern philanthropy. Carnegie argued that surplus wealth is put to best use (i.e. produces the greatest net benefit to society) when it is administered carefully by the wealthy. Carnegie also argues against wasteful use of capital in the form of extravagance, irresponsible spending, or self-indulgence, instead promoting the administration of said capital over the course of one's lifetime toward the cause of reducing the stratification between the rich and poor. As a result, the wealthy should administer their riches responsibly and not in a way that encourages "the slothful, the drunken, the unworthy". [wikipedia]