TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]. Addie W. Hunton, Kathryn M. Johnson.
TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]
TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]
TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]
TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]
TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]

TWO COLORED WOMEN WITH THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES [INSCRIBED BY ADDIE HUNTON TO HER DAUGHTER EUNICE CARTER]

Brooklyn, New York: Bbooklyn [i.e. Brooklyn] Eagle Press, [1920]. First Edition, First Printing. Octavo, 256 pages; [4] index; G/none; bound in publisher's blue cloth, gilt to front board; spine with faded gilt titling, vertical creases and cracking, chipping to head and tail of spine; cracking along hinges; scratches to top edge of text block; pages 9/10, 109/110 with open tears along lower fore corner; light staining to page 76; plate at page 58 detached but loose within; small ink stain to page 157; gutter beginning to show at tail of pages 62/63, 94/95, 142/143; 183-186, 199-206, 215-222 uncut;

presumably an early issue, with the fore and lower edges roughly hand-cut, opposed to the usual machine trim; some pencil marking and marginalia through page 41;

Inscribed on the ffep "To my daughter Eunice Roberta Hunton with deep appreciation for her help and criticisms in the preparation of this volume. Addie Hunton."

shelved case 1.

1353975

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $5,000

NOTES

Extremely scarce, with only one copy showing at auction on RareBookHub and no copies listed on Worldcat, COPAC, or KVK. The Library of Congress has two copies (one lost), NYPL has four copies (three in the Schomburg Center), Harvard's Widener Library has one copy, and Yale has three, including two in the James Weldon Johnson collection.

Eunice Carter was one of New York's first female African-American lawyers, and one of the first prosecutors of color in the United States. She was active in the Pan-African Congress and in United Nations committees to advance the status of women in the world. She led a massive prostitution racketeering investigation, building the case and strategy that allowed New York District Attorney Thomas Dewey to successfully charge Mafioso kingpin Charles "Lucky" Luciano with compulsory prostitution. [wikipedia] Before studying law she spent a brief time as a social worker and wrote short stories, some of which appeared in journals alongside works by Langston Hughes and other writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Hunton married Lisle Carter Sr., who was one of the first African-American dentists in New York. Her mother, Addie Waites Hunton (1866-1943) was an African-American suffragist, race and gender activist, writer, political organizer, and educator. Hunton worked as vice president and field secretary of the NAACP and she helped to organize the fourth Pan-African Congress in 1927, after previously serving as the national organizer for the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) from 1906 to 1910 and serving in the U.S. Army during World War I.;