1352259 GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]. C. S. Smith.
GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]
GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]
GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]
GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]

GLIMPSES OF AFRICA [INSCRIBED TO ADDIE HUNTON]

Nashville, Tenn. A. M. E. Church Sunday School Union, 1895. First Edition. Octavo, 288 pages; VG; bound in bright blue cloth, gilt titling to spine and front cover; slight fading to spine, mild wear and rubbing; faded toning, possibly water, to the edges of the front board; top edge of rear board with some staining; interior age-toned; Inscribed by C. S. Smith to Addie Hunton on the sfep, dated Dec. 31, 1897 in Nashville, Tenn.; scarce, especially signed; shelved case 9.

1352259

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $900

NOTES

Addie Waites Hunton (1866-1943) was an African-American suffragist, race and gender activist, writer, political organizer, and educator. Hunton worked as vice president and field secretary of the NAACP and she helped to organize the fourth Pan-African Congress in 1927, after previously serving as the national organizer for the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) from 1906 to 1910 and serving in the U.S. Army during World War I.;

Charles Spencer Smith (1852–1923) was a Methodist minister and afterwards bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church as well as an Alabama state legislator. He wrote numerous pamphlets during his lifetime, as well as a history of the AME Church and Glimpses of Africa (1895) chronicling his 1894 trip to the African continent. His second wife, Christine Shoecraft Smith served as the 13th president of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs (NACWC).;

Smith said he went to Africa "First, to gratify a long-cherished desire to see that country. Second, to see what the European is doing there. Third, to see what the African himself is doing. Fourth, to gain knowledge of the operations of missionary effort. Fifth, to study the effects of the climate on the human condition. Sixth to see if there are any openings for the employment of the skill and energy of intelligent and industrious young Americans of African descent." [page 5]