GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS. Zadock Thompson.
GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS
GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS
GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS
GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS
GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS

GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF LOWER CANADA, DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS

Stanstead and Sherbrooke, L. C. Walton & Gaylord, 1835. First Edition. 10mo., 116 pages; Fair; in original publisher's quarter brown leather, blue paper boards, front cover has reprint of title page within a frame; rear cover missing fore half, front cover with chipping and wear to all edges, spine chipped to head and tail; some fingerprint smudges to interior; lacking map; page 57 has a small newspaper clipping, detailing the 1891 Census, pasted above the lesson on population; extremely scarce Lower Canadian Imprint; shelved case 3.

9-22-1318074

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $1,000

NOTES

The Province of Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791–1841). It covered the southern portion of the current Province of Quebec and the Labrador region of the current Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The colony/province was abolished in 1841 when it and adjacent Upper Canada were united into the Province of Canada.;

"Thompson's Lower Canada was a curiously uneven book. The first seventy-six pages, devoted to geography, were very elementary, with brief lessons illustrating different aspects of Canadian geography and institutions. Thompson displayed a decided pro-British bias and referred to the majority of French Canadians as "generally illiterate and ignorant." The forty thin pages of history in Lower Canada hardly merited the title. Thompson simply reduced the first section of his 'History of the State of Vermont' and adapted it for the Canadian text. He did not even try to fill in with details of Canadian history, but instead spliced together any sections from hiss Vermont work which pertained to Canada. As a result his broken narrative went to 1776 and the failure of the American invasion and then skipped over three decades to a one-sided view of the was of 1812 with which he closed the book. [Graffagnino, K. "Zadock Thompson and The Story of Vermont." Vermont History 47.4 (1979): 244-245]