THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD

THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD

London: printed [by William Stansby] for Walter Burre [and are to be sold at his shop in Paules Church-yard at the signe of the Crane], 1614. First Edition. Folio; G+; bound in early diced brown calf, newly rebacked with new spine and corners, paneled with gilt lettering; housed in a custom brown buckram covered clamshell; With the Poem and the engraved title page. Both have been trimmed and inlaid, possibly having been married to this copy from another.; With 5 folding maps, Lacking 3 maps: the Arabian Desert (pages 414/415), Troy (452/453), and Troy (454/455). Maps trimmed incredibly close, with map of the Middle East impacted just slightly.; Lacking blank leaf 3K4 and terminal blank 7C6; 4G3r has the woodcut initial hand-colored, with the color bleeding over to the facing page; with the Errata leaf at the end; Printer’s name and bookseller’s address from colophon.; "The first part of the historie of the vvorld .. The third booke" (caption title) begins new pagination on 4A1r.; LD consignment; shelved case 4.

9-20-1313997

Shelved Dupont Bookstore

Price: $12,000

NOTES

Written during his imprisonment in the Tower of London, the History of the World consists of a million words, spanning from the biblical creation of the world to 146 BCE. The work was intended to serve as an educational tool for Henry, Prince of Wales (1594-1612) and includes numerous references to warfare, law and kingship.

It was entered 15 April 1611 in the Stationers' Register, but not published until 29 March 1614, due to the death of Prince Henry.

Once published, James had it immediately suppressed and subsequently issued with no title page, and therefore no authorial acknowledgement.;

"In the century that followed [the publication] it was vastly influential...The book went through eleven editions in the 17th century, outselling even Shakespeare's collected works. It was not until 5 January 1615 that a letter from Archbishop Abbot reached [The Stationers Company], telling them that he had express orders from His Majesty that the book should be suppressed and withdrawn from shops. By this time the book had nearly sold out, and it does appear from the letter that the Archbishop may once have praised it." [Raleigh Trevelyan];

"Sir Walter Raleigh's book is called in by the king's commandment for divers exceptions, but especially for being too saucy in censuring princes. I hear he takes it much to heart, for he thought he had won his spurs and pleased the king extraordinarily." [Letter from John Chamberlain, Esq to Sir Dudley Carleton];

ESTC S116300;